Friday, December 4, 2009

CETP Redux: Lower is Better . . . No, Wait, Higher is Better?

Higher HDL inhibits heart disease, right? CETP inhibits HDL production, right? Ergo, find an agent that inhibits CETP, raises HDL, and you will reduce heart disease right? Well, maybe! Then again, maybe not.

The torcetrapib debacle showed that CETP can be inhibited thereby generating spectacular increases in HDL but you actually increase risk due to side effects like raising blood pressure (side effects that are not produced by newer agents like anacetrapib and dalcetrapib). There is also some question that the HDL produced by CETP inhibition may be defective. Now comes a new study that shows CETP inhibition in and of itself my be atherogenic.

Given that one of my problems is low HDL, I was so damn hopeful that CETP agents would be part of my personal cure. I think it is time to bet my family farm on something else while we wait another decade for the evidence. Yes, I think it will take that long to figure it all out. I suggest we start dreaming about some other miracle advance (sigh)!

Looking out for your heart health,


HeartHawk

17 comments:

vitamine b6 said...

CETP has two functions: it helps move cholesterol from the arteries to the liver, and it helps control the size of cholesterol particles circulating in the blood. People with the protective gene variant have higher levels of "good" HDL cholesterol and also produce bigger cholesterol particles, which scientists believe may not stick to blood-vessel walls as easily as small particles do. I hope now you can decide which is better..

Anonymous said...

What about sage tea, which was shown to raise HDL pretty well in a recent study listed on PubMed? I don't know the mechanism (CETP, PPAR, or something else), and my original reservation was gender-related (the study was on women only) ... but the rapid 50% increase in HDL from a dietary ingredient seemed pretty good - until I read your post.

Thanks,

Jonathan

HeartHawk said...

Jonathan:

Thanks for the scoop on Sage Tea. I'm going to look into it. Looks like you have also been doing your homework (comments on CETP and PPAR). Any chance you are a Track Your Plaque Member? They are the most intense group of lay heart disease researchers I have ever met! They always teach me new things.

Regards,


HeartHawk

Anonymous said...

I read the Heartscan blog fairly regularly, but am not in the tracking program... still just get the basic lipid panels from my GP ... sub-optimal.

Here's a link to the sage study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769154/?tool=pubmed

Another botanicals of interest to me is Tulsi (Holy Basil) which has been shown to induce expression of genes that may inhibit artery disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16180103

translation service said...

The collapse torcetrapib showed that CETP could be hampered, creating a spectacular improvement in HDL, but you actually increase the risk because of side effects such as hypertension.

body shops said...

People who have a genetic variant of protection is higher than "good" cholesterol and HDL cholesterol particles also produce a larger, which scientists believe can not be transmitted to the vessel walls as easily as the small particles do not. Hopefully now we can decide which is better.

translation service said...

These were really great information given by you, Showed that torcetrapib disaster CETP inhibition may therefore cause an amazing increase in HDL, but you actually increase the risk of side effects such as hypertension,

kaileesteven01 said...

This is really great article. CETP inhibitors may reduce the levels of LP. The risk of an individual to heart disease are assessed according to levels in the LP days. Infact it could soon be used in other areas.

Debt Help

adelaide photographers said...

Sage is an herb that is most commonly used as an infusion, extract, tincture, poultice and spice. The oil from sage can be used as a carminative or a stimulant.Medicinally, sage tea has traditionally been used for inflammations of the mouth, throat and tonsils, as its volatile oils soothe the mucous membranes.

Anonymous said...

Well since I'm trying to increase my anthocyanin intake to prevent high purine levels, I'll hope it helps with HDL without increasing BP. I figure as long as I don't go crazy on the darker foods, I shouldn't get side effects like I might with pharmaceuticals.

Anonymous said...

However, the LDL dropped about 14% more in the anthocycanin supplemented group than the control group. In addition HDL level rose by 13.7% in the anthocyanin group but changed little in the placebo group. The researchers also noted a significant drop in plasma Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP).

http://www.medicalnutritional.com/news.aspx/anthocyanins-offer-heart-benefits (there were some inflammation results on this page too)

Shreela

remedioscolesterol said...

The collapse of torcetrapib has shown that CETP could be hampered, to improve the HDL to create stunning, but you can actually increase the risk of side effects such as hypertension.

hp coupon code said...

I try to increase my intake of anthocyanins to avoid purine levels, I hope it contributes to HDL without increasing BP. Darkest time I guess do not worry about food.

point of sale displays said...

People with the safety gene different have greater amounts of good trans fat and also generate larger trans fat debris, which experts believe may not adhere to blood-vessel.

Table and chair hire in London said...

The torcetrapib catastrophe CETP self-consciousness may therefore cause an awesome improve in HDL, but it actually improve the chance of negative results such as blood pressure.

xlpharmacy said...

Wonderful, i have read a lot about this and i really wonder if i can really treat something like this.

martindevid5 said...

You have given nice article. It is very informative for the of HDL knowledge. Thank you for sharing best information. Keep it up.


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